Friday, December 19, 2014

Mistletoe Facts and Solstice Stargazing Sunday Evening

Seems like we were just talking about Fall leaves and acorns, and here we are at the winter solstice.  Now that the leaves are off the trees we can see one of the romantic symbols of the season, mistletoe, high in the treetops.  Mistletoe has a long tradition, dating back to pagan times, of being associated with mystical romantic powers. Thus that kissing under the mistletoe routine at holiday gatherings.  Mistletoe is interesting in that it's a hemiparasitic plant, which means it attaches itself high up in trees, like oaks, pines, but it can also grow on its own.  I grew up in a rural area of North Carolina and the people who sold it at the holidays would shoot it out of trees.  Quite the talent, don't you think?

Mistletoe in the treetop
Sunday is the winter solstice, the shortest and darkest day of the year--perfect skies for our Winter Solstice Stargazing event this Sunday evening at Sandy Creek Park in Durham.  Why do I like the Winter Solstice?  Because the days keep getting longer after that, which means Spring is on it's way! Stonehenge is a fantastic example of ancient societies observing the changes in seasons.  Archeologists believe that Stonehenge was built to observe the winter solstice sunrise.  Take a look at this photo and see how the sun rises through the prehistoric monument. So, if you're looking for things to do with the family in town for the holidays, come to Sandy Creek Park in Durham between 5:30pm and 7:30pm and look at the winter skies through our telescopes!